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KENNEL CLUB INVITES APPLICATIONS FOR CHAMPIONSHIP OBEDIENCE STATUS

Friday, November 10, 2017 - Posted by KC Press Release, in General

The Kennel Club wishes to advise obedience competitors that Chadkirk Dog Training Club has relinquished its championship obedience status with effect from 2018.

Any society which would be interested in applying for future championship obedience status should submit a presentation for consideration. Please note that it will be necessary to select a date that does not coincide with another championship obedience show.

Applications should include details of the society’s committee structure and show management team, as well as information on the proposed show venue and its facilities available for judges, competitors, dogs and spectators.

Presentations should be submitted to Rachel Mansfield, in the Working Dog Activities Team at the Kennel Club, via email obedience@thekennelclub.org.uk by 1st December 2017.

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CHANGES TO OBEDIENCE REGULATIONS

Wednesday, November 1, 2017 - Posted by KC Press Release, in General, Obedience Liaison Council

The Kennel Club has recently approved changes to the regulations for obedience.

With effect from 1st January 2018, the following amendment to the regulations has been made to allow for entry in to a special class without also having to enter a standard class at obedience show:

Amendment to Regulation G(A)3

TO:

A dog not qualified to enter Championship Class C must be entered in the lowest available class for which it is eligible and may also be entered in another class if desired plus one additional class at the society’s discretion. Only qualified dogs may be entered in Championship Class C and these dogs may also enter Open Class C and one additional class at the society’s discretion. (Note the qualifications for Championship Class C and Obedience Warrant.)

Exemptions from this regulation are:-

A dog entered in a Good Citizen Dog Scheme Special Pre-Beginner Obedience Stakes Class or

A dog entered into a Young Kennel Club (YKC) Obedience Class which may also be entered in a maximum of two other scheduled classes (including YKC classes) for which it is eligible or

A dog only entered in a special class (or classes) provided such a class (or classes) are defined in the schedule. Such entries must be made in line with the show’s closing date for entries.

(Insertions underlined.)

With effect from 1st January 2018, the following amendment to the regulations has been made to remove the provision for dogs to wear a slip chain whilst in the ring as their use was not consistent with modern and progressive training methods. Additionally, it allows for a dog to wear a flea collar in the ring as well as a half-check or smooth collar:

Amendment to Regulation G35.h

TO:

Dogs may only wear a slip chain, a half-check collar or a smooth collar when in the ring. A medicated collar may also be worn in the ring.

(Deletion struck through. Insertion underlined.)

With effect from 1st January 2018, the following amendment to the regulations has been made to reduce the stay times in Class B and Class C:

Amendment to Regulation G(A)10.b Class B and G(A)11.d Class C

TO:

(4) Sit 2 minutes, handler out of sight.                   20 points

(5) Down 5 4 minutes, handler out of sight.          30 points

TO:

(4) Sit 2 minutes, handler out of sight.                   20 points

(5) Down 10 5 minutes, Handler out of sight.       50 points

(Deletions struck through. Insertions underlined.)

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NEW RESEARCH REVEALS PREVALENCE OF HEALTH CONDITIONS IN UK’S DOGS

Tuesday, September 19, 2017 - Posted by KC Press Release, in General

Large scale study published on disorders in 192 Kennel Club recognised breeds will help to improve health of Britain’s much-loved pedigree dogs

  • Top three disorders in UK dogs are all skin conditions – lipoma, cysts and allergic skin problems
  • Boxers were found to have the highest number of reported conditions occurring at a higher prevalence than overall across all breeds, followed by the Cavalier King Charles Spaniel and the Pug
  • Labrador was found to have the highest number of reported conditions occurring at a lower prevalence than overall across all breeds, followed by the Cocker Spaniel and Border Terrier
  • 90 disorders show a significantly different prevalence in at least one breed compared to overall prevalence across all breeds
  • Study is one of the largest of its kind ever carried out and used morbidity data on 43,005 living dogs registered with the Kennel Club, across 192 breeds
  • Findings substantially contribute to the current understanding of disorder occurrence in dogs in the UK and will help dog owners, breeders and vets to identify which breeds are most likely to suffer from which disorders

A study by researchers at the UK’s largest dog welfare organisation and registry body for pedigree dogs, the Kennel Club, has shed light on the prevalence of health conditions in pedigree dog breeds, which could help improve the health of the UK’s estimated 8.5 million dogs.

The study, published in the Canine Genetics and Epidemiology journal (15th September 2017), is one of the largest of its kind ever carried out and used owner-reported morbidity data on 43,005 living dogs registered with the Kennel Club, across 192 breeds, regardless of whether disorders received veterinary care.

The research aimed to determine the prevalence of health disorders of varying severity, influenced by both genetics and environment, among pedigree dogs overall and, where possible, determine any variation among breeds.  This will help dog owners, breeders and vets to be aware of any relevant health concerns and identify which breeds are most at risk of suffering from which disorders.

The study found that the most commonly reported health condition in dogs was fatty skin masses (lipoma), with around one in twenty-five dogs (4.3 per cent) affected these, meaning that over 365,000 dogs in the UK could currently be affected.  The second most commonly reported condition was skin cysts, which affected 3.1 per cent of the population. The third most common condition was allergic skin conditions, which the study found affected 2.7 per cent of dogs.  As in humans, conditions such as these in dogs vary in severity, from more trivial conditions that will have no impact on a dog’s quality of life to those more severe conditions that do.

Depending on their location and size, lipomata and skin cysts are often incidental findings of little significance to affected dogs or their owners.  Allergic skin conditions can be more troublesome, and almost certainly have inherited components.  However, there are a number of environmental factors that can cause skin irritations and allergies that can be avoided, such as human skincare products and toiletries, and cleaning and other household products, and it is important for dog owners to remember that products that are suitable for humans to use on or near their skin may not be appropriate for dogs.  The recent trend for dog clothing has also been implicated as a potential factor in the apparent increase in allergic skin conditions in dogs.

The study found that Boxers had the highest number of reported diseases or conditions at a higher prevalence than overall, with skin cancer or tumours being the most commonly reported condition in the breed.  The breed with a higher prevalence of the second highest number of reported conditions was the Cavalier King Charles Spaniel, with heart murmurs being the most commonly reported condition in this breed.  The breed with greater prevalence of the third highest number of reported conditions was the Pug, with corneal ulcers being reported as the top condition.  The study found that just under two thirds of living dogs had no reported health conditions.

Conversely, the study found that the Labrador has the highest number of reported conditions occurring at a lower prevalence than overall across all breeds, with the Cocker Spaniel having the second highest, and the Border Terrier with the third.

For the most common disorders in the most represented breeds, there were ninety with a significantly higher prevalence in at least one breed compared to the overall prevalence across all breeds.  The most striking of these differences were umbilical hernias in the Shih Tzu (12 per cent compared to 1.2 per cent overall) and lipoma in the Weimaraner (17.5 per cent compared to 4.3 per cent overall).  Conversely, for the most common disorders in the most represented breeds, two examples with a  significantly lower breed prevalence compared to the overall prevalence across all breeds were hypersensitivity in the Bearded Collie (0.4 per cent compared to 2.7 per cent overall) and skin cysts in the Rough Collie (0.5 per cent compared to 3.1 per cent overall).  Comparing the within breed prevalence to the prevalence over all breeds gives insight into which breeds could be at a higher or lower risk of being affected with certain heath conditions, which will be useful to owners, breeders, puppy buyers and vets.

Dr Katy Evans, Kennel Club Health Research Manager, one of the authors of the study, said:  “Dogs of any breed or crossbreed can suffer from conditions that affect their health, both those for which inheritance plays a part and those caused by external factors. The results of this study will substantially contribute to the current understanding of disorder occurrence in dogs in the UK and will be a massive help to dog owners as it gives them an idea of what to look out for, particularly if their breed has a higher than average incidence of a certain condition.

“The majority of the larger studies into disease prevalence rely on primary care veterinary data, which does not take into account dogs which may be affected by fairly harmless conditions that can be safely managed at home without veterinary treatment.  By gathering and analysing large amounts of owner reported data, we can get a clearer picture of the health of the whole dog population.

“Much of what the study found confirms what the Kennel Club and responsible dog breeders already know, which is reflected in the range of health schemes and other tools already in place to tackle various conditions, and it will certainly help us to prioritise health concerns in dogs and further develop plans to protect their health.”

The Kennel Club is using the findings as part of its Breed Health and Conservation Plans, which will ensure that all health concerns in dogs are identified through evidence-based criteria and that breeders are provided with appropriate information and resources to ensure they are supported in tackling health problems and achieving positive health goals for dogs, now and in the future.  The Breed Health and Conservation Plans take a holistic view of breed health with consideration given to known hereditary conditions, complex hereditary conditions, conformational concerns and population genetics.  

The full study has been published in the Canine Genetics and Epidemiology journal and can be viewed at https://cgejournal.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s40575-017-0047-3.

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KENNEL CLUB OPENS NEW AYLESBURY OFFICE

Wednesday, September 13, 2017 - Posted by KC Press Release, in General

The Kennel Club has opened its new offices in Aylesbury, having moved a matter of yards away from its previous home in the Alton House Office Park in Gatehouse Way.

The Kennel Club moved its core operational activities to Aylesbury from its headquarters in London in the summer of 1999, namely the registration, Petlog and call centre services. In the original move, five members of the London team relocated to Aylesbury, while other members of staff were recruited locally. Alton House was originally obtained on a ten-year lease which was then renewed in 2009.

The new Aylesbury address is known as Kennel Club House and its purchase was made possible through the £12m payment that the Kennel Club received when it struck a deal with British Land in 2013 to move its London headquarters further up Clarges Street in Mayfair. The money also enabled the Kennel Club to purchase its recently-opened Emblehope and Burngrange Estate in Northumberland which it aims to develop as a centre of excellence for working dogs.

The Aylesbury office handles high volume activities on behalf of the Club, with the monthly average equating to 48,000 telephone calls, 20,000 puppy registrations, 14,000 transfer applications and 70,000 microchip recordings.

Caroline Kisko, Kennel Club Secretary, said: “It is strange to think that the Kennel Club has had premises in Aylesbury for 18 years as, for some of us, it seems like only yesterday that the original building in Alton House Office Park was opened. We are very pleased that the move into the new Kennel Club offices went very smoothly – in fact there was no down time to any single service during the transitioning of both service and staff to the new building.”

The new address for the Kennel Club offices in Aylesbury is Kennel Club House, Gatehouse Way, Aylesbury, Buckinghamshire HP19 8DB. The telephone number remains the same – 01296 318540.

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HEELWORK TO MUSIC AND FREESTYLE TEAM GB 2018 LOOKING FOR MEMBERS

Friday, August 4, 2017 - Posted by KC Press Release, in General

The Kennel Club is making plans to enter a team to compete at the World Heelwork to Music and Freestyle Championships in the Netherlands from 9th-12th August 2018 and the Open European Heelwork to Music and Freestyle Championships in Switzerland from 12th-14th October 2018. Applications are therefore invited from competitors wishing to be considered for Heelwork to Music Team GB.

The Open European Championships are open to all dogs, including those on the Kennel Club Activity Register without recorded ancestry; however, the World Championships are open only to dogs registered on the breed register. To be eligible to be considered, dogs must currently be competing in advanced classes in heelwork to music and/or freestyle. The competition will be held indoors for both events.

Applicants should be aware that competing will be on an entirely self-funded basis, and that being on Team GB is hard work and time consuming. Handlers must be prepared to organise and attend fundraising events, team meetings and training sessions.

Handlers wishing to be considered should request an application form by email from htm@thekennelclub.org.uk or telephone 01296 318540. The deadline for completed applications to reach the Kennel Club is Friday 13th October 2017.

Caroline Kisko, Kennel Club Secretary, said: “These two international competitions represent a wonderful opportunity for British heelwork to music competitors. We look forward to receiving a good number of applications and also to cheering on the British teams when they compete in the Netherlands and Switzerland in 2018.”

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KC PROHIBITS USE OF AVERSIVE COLLARS AT LICENSED EVENTS

Tuesday, July 25, 2017 - Posted by KC Press Release, in General

The Kennel Club Board has recently approved amendments, originating from a recommendation made by the Working Trials Liaison Council, to the Welfare of Dogs regulations, which will prohibit the use of pinch collars, electronic shock collars and prong collars at any agility, obedience, working trials, heelwork to music, rally and canicross licensed events governed by the Kennel Club Activities Committee.

The regulation changes will come into effect on 1st January 2018.

The Kennel Club is currently campaigning for a ban on electronic shock collars to be introduced in Scotland, and a campaign for similar legislation in England is planned. Legislation was introduced in Wales in 2010.

Additionally, it is recommended that clubs may wish to include provision regarding the use of such techniques or devices within their own regulations.

The regulation changes are as follows:

Canicross

Regulation E1. Welfare of Dogs

TO:

An exhibitor (or competitor) whose dog is entered at a Kennel Club licensed event should take all reasonable steps to ensure the needs of their dog(s) are met, and should not knowingly put their dogs’ health and welfare at risk by any action, default, omission or otherwise. A breach of this Regulation may be referred to the Board for disciplinary action under Kennel Club Rules and Regulations. The use of pinch collars, electronic shock collars, or prong collars, is not permitted at any Canicross event licensed by the Kennel Club. This shall apply at the venue or within the precincts of the competition.

(Insertion underlined.)

Obedience

Regulation G2. Welfare of Dogs

TO:

An exhibitor (or competitor) whose dog is entered at a Kennel Club licensed event should take all reasonable steps to ensure the needs of their dog(s) are met, and should not knowingly put their dogs’ health and welfare at risk by any action, default, omission or otherwise. A breach of this Regulation may be referred to the Board for disciplinary action under Kennel Club Rules and Regulations. The use of pinch collars, electronic shock collars, or prong collars, is not permitted at any Obedience show licensed by the Kennel Club. This shall apply at the venue or within the precincts of the show.

(Insertion underlined.)

Agility

Regulation H3. Welfare of Dogs

TO:

An exhibitor (or competitor) whose dog is entered at a Kennel Club licensed event should take all reasonable steps to ensure the needs of their dog(s) are met, and should not knowingly put their dogs’ health and welfare at risk by any action, default, omission or otherwise. A breach of this Regulation may be referred to the Board for disciplinary action under Kennel Club Rules and Regulations. The use of pinch collars, electronic shock collars, or prong collars, is not permitted at any Agility show licensed by the Kennel Club. This shall apply at the venue or within the precincts of the show.

(Insertion underlined.)

Working Trials

Regulation I2. Welfare of Dogs

TO:

An exhibitor (or competitor) whose dog is entered at a Kennel Club licensed event should take all reasonable steps to ensure the needs of their dog(s) are met, and should not knowingly put their dogs’ health and welfare at risk by any action, default, omission or otherwise. A breach of this Regulation may be referred to the Board for disciplinary action under Kennel Club Rules and Regulations. The use of pinch collars, electronic shock collars, or prong collars, is not permitted at any Working Trials event licensed by the Kennel Club. This shall apply at the venue or within the precincts of the Trial.

(Insertion underlined.)

Heelwork to Music

Regulation L1. Welfare of Dogs

TO:

An exhibitor (or competitor) whose dog is entered at a Kennel Club licensed event should take all reasonable steps to ensure the needs of their dog(s) are met, and should not knowingly put their dogs’ health and welfare at risk by any action, default, omission or otherwise. A breach of this Regulation may be referred to the Board for disciplinary action under Kennel Club Rules and Regulations. The use of pinch collars, electronic shock collars, or prong collars, is not permitted at any Heelwork to Music event licensed by the Kennel Club. This shall apply at the venue or within the precincts of the competition.

(Insertion underlined.)

Rally

Regulation S1. Welfare of Dogs

TO:

An exhibitor (or competitor) whose dog is entered at a Kennel Club licensed event should take all reasonable steps to ensure the needs of their dog(s) are met, and should not knowingly put their dogs’ health and welfare at risk by any action, default, omission or otherwise. A breach of this Regulation may be referred to the Board for disciplinary action under Kennel Club Rules and Regulations. The use of pinch collars, electronic shock collars, or prong collars, is not permitted at any Rally event licensed by the Kennel Club. This shall apply at the venue or within the precincts of the competition.

(Insertion underlined.)

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KENNEL CLUB STREAMLINES REGISTRATION OPTIONS FOR NON-PEDIGREE DOGS

Tuesday, July 25, 2017 - Posted by KC Press Release, in General

In order to provide a beneficial long term registration product for owners of crossbreeds, or purebred dogs without a Kennel Club recorded pedigree, the Kennel Club will no longer be accepting applications for its Companion Dog Club (CDC) register as of 1st August 2017.  New or existing owners of these dogs will instead be encouraged to register them with the Kennel Club’s Activity Register.

The Kennel Club acknowledges that the interest and uptake in the Companion Dog Club has declined over the years and as such has made the decision not to accept any new additions to this registry and to enable dog owners to utilise the benefits of the Activity Register.

The Kennel Club launched the Companion Dog Club to enable owners of companion dogs, including crossbreeds, rescue dogs and purebred dogs with no recorded parentage details, to enjoy the benefits of being registered with the Kennel Club.  The benefits available through the Activity Register now surpass those offered by the Companion Dog Club, and include enabling dogs to compete in activities such as agility, flyball, rally, obedience and canicross, as well as allowing for health test results to be recorded against a dog’s registration, which was not possible with the CDC register.

Records will remain in place with the Kennel Club for all existing members of the Companion Dog Club and they are still eligible to enter Companion Dog Club classes at companion dog shows, which will be the case for the foreseeable future. The Kennel Club encourages dog owners to enter companion dog shows to support the great charity work these shows do.  In addition, CDC members will also continue to receive discounts to Eukanuba Discover Dogs and Crufts.

Caroline Kisko, Kennel Club Secretary, said:  “Like any service providing organisation, the Kennel Club wants to offer a service that will best benefit its customers.  It is clear from the declining uptake in the Companion Dog Club over the years compared to the consistent popularity of the Activity Register that streamlining the registration options outside of the breed register is the sensible and practical way forward. 

“Owners of crossbreeds, dogs that take part in canine activities and purebred dogs without a recorded pedigree can still apply for their dogs to be recorded on the Activity Register, which offers a number of benefits, including the recording of parentage details where known, health test results and the fact that it is joined up to the popular MyKC service – all things that were not possible with the Companion Dog Club.”

“We will continue to promote all companion dog shows through the Kennel Club website to encourage dog owners to enjoy this fun activity and to support local charities and communities.”

More information on Kennel Club registration options can be found at www.thekennelclub.org.uk/registration
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KENNEL CLUB ISSUES GUIDANCE DOCUMENT ON OBEDIENCE HEELWORK POSITIONS

Tuesday, June 27, 2017 - Posted by KC Press Release, in General

Following on from the rewording of the Descriptions and Explanatory Notes for Obedience Tests that was issued at the end of 2016, the Kennel Club was requested to issue guidance on what to look for when judging heelwork in accordance with the new wording.

In response to these requests the Kennel Club has created the Obedience Heelwork Positions document which is intended to assist judges in making fair and informed decisions in their judging of dogs competing in obedience tests.

The document provides illustrations of working styles, which will also be useful for competitors to ensure that their dogs are working in a happy and natural manner whilst maintaining a natural topline.

The document can be found on the Kennel Club website at the following link:

www.thekennelclub.org.uk/media/1146930/obedience_heelwork_position.pdf

Any queries regarding the document and its implementation should be directed to email obedience@thekennelclub.org.uk

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Please check your details on Obedience Judges list

Thursday, June 1, 2017 - Posted by Kennel Club, in General

The Kennel Club have recently updated their list of those who have passed the Obedience Judges Seminars. Upon doing so, it has been brought to our attention that some people are down as only having passed one of the seminars when they have passed both or are missing from the list altogether.

We are therefore asking that all those who have attended and passed the seminars check their information on the list and let us know if it is incorrect.

 

Please email obedience@thekennelclub.org.uk with the date of the seminar you attended, the names of the Accredited Trainers who delivered the seminar and a copy of the certificate issued on passing the assessments. Your record will then be updated.

 

In addition, we are attempting to update everyone’s contact details and are asking for email addresses in order to remove addresses from the website. Therefore, if you wish to have your email address added to the list and your address removed, please let us know at the above email address.

Please check the list on:

http://www.thekennelclub.org.uk/media/386938/obedience_judges_seminars_taken.pdf


Rachel Mansfield

WDA Officer

01296 318540 Ext: 331

Fax: 020 7518 1046 

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2017 Heats for the KCGCDS Special Pre Beginner Obedience Stakes

Monday, April 3, 2017 - Posted by KC, in General

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